The Filtered Excellence: January 30, 2020

Bob Geldof once asked us, “Where is the filtered excellence!?” It’s right here. Once a week we take a break from comedy to bring you this week’s picks of the best things to watch, the most interesting things to do, great things to try, the best picks to read, our favorite things to listen to and more.


WATCH THIS

What Did Jack Do?  This short film from David Lynch made its World Premiere in Paris back in 2017, its U.S. premiere at Lynch’s ‘Festival Of Disruption’ in 2018 and now –  coinciding with his 74th birthday – is available on Netflix.  Lynch wrote, directed, edited and co-stars in this story of a homicide detective who is interrogating a tormented monkey in a locked down train station.  If it sounds strange, it is.  But in the hands of Lynch, thanks to some great visual effects, lighting and cinematography, it’s a surreal and humorous take on police procedures.  There’s even a sly, bizarre callback to one of Lynch’s best work, Twin Peaks.  It’s another walk on the weird side from a truly imaginative and offbeat filmmaker.  What Did Jack Do is available now on Netflix.

DO THIS

New York City. Good Luck Dry Cleaners.  What began as a dry cleaning store in Williamsburg quickly evolved into a two-story speakeasy gallery that presented the work of the city’s best creatives.  It does so free of any of the pretentiousness and elitism that has come to symbolize the art world.  Now located in the heart of the Bowery, Good Luck Dry Cleaners carries on the artistic vibe of the Lower East Side featuring the recent works of some of the best True Yorkers. At the center of the recent exhibit is Ricky Powell, whose photographs of Andy Warhol, Basquiat and the first golden age of Hip Hop defined 80s/90s New York.  With music from the period as a backdrop and overall relaxed atmosphere, Good Luck Dry Cleaners is a perfect spot to do an old fashioned New York City hang.  You can go to www.goodluckdrycleaners.com for gallery hours and more information.

New York City The International Center Of Photography.   Since 1974, The International Center Of Photography has been at the forefront at presenting socially conscious exhibitions, educational programs, community outreach and public programming.  The ICP has recently re-launched at its new space on the Lower East Side that allows them to accomplish all of its goals in one location.  It will feature exhibition galleries, media labs, classrooms, darkrooms, equipment rooms and shooting studios.  There’s also an extensive research library, public event spaces and much more.   With photography more popular than ever, this is the one place that will cover every facet of the genre.  The International Center Of Photography is open every day except Tuesday.  You can also go to www.icp.org for tickets and more information.

Los Angeles.  The Bonfire by Kim Gordon.   In the near ten years since Sonic Youth called it quits, bassist Kim Gordon has dabbled in acting, released her memoir, Girl In A Band and played in a number of new band projects.  Now Gordon has a new exhibit that features her renewed interest in another one of her passions, visual arts.  The Bonfire is her new multi-media exhibit that showcases a series of photographs and sculptures done specifically for the gallery.  It also contains a video installation featuring Gordon walking around L.A. rubbing a guitar on fence posts and other street objects, turning a simple L.A. stroll into performance art.  It’s work that can only come from noise rock’s baddest badasses.  The Bonfire by Kim Gordon will be view at the 303 Gallery in Los Angeles through February 22nd.  You can also go to www.303gallery.com for more information.

Miami: The Museum of Graffiti.  As more cities around the world begin to embrace graffiti/street artists, the city of Miami has opened the first museum to ‘preserve graffiti’s history and celebrate its emergence in design, fashion, advertising and galleries’.  It has an indoor exhibit space, 11 exterior murals, a fine art gallery and a gift shop featuring limited edition merchandise and exclusive items from some of the best street artists in the world.  There will also be panel discussions, meet and greets and book signings designed to educate and shed new light on what motivates and inspires the artist.  Whether you are an aspiring artist, a collector or just a fan, it honors the past with an eye out towards the future.  The Musuem Of Graffiti is open every day except on Tuesdays.  You can also go to www.museumofgrafiti.org for tickets and more information.

 

Want more excellence? Read last week’s the filtered excellence.

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Earl Douglas is a writer/photographer based in New York City. A frequent contributor to The Interrobang, Earl is also Executive Director for the New York chapter of The Black Rock Coalition. Earl worked in radio for nearly two decades at WNEW-FM and XM Satellite Radio, which included being the on-air producer for Carol Miller, Scott Muni and Ron & Fez, and a contributor to Opie & Anthony. Earl has also independently published a number of books including Black Rock Volume 1, Urban Abyss, Mobile Uploads, and For Shimmy. His latest project is the photojournalism magazine PRAXIS, which is available exclusively through Blurb.com.

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Earl Douglas
Earl Douglas
Earl Douglas is a writer/photographer based in New York City. A frequent contributor to The Interrobang, Earl is also Executive Director for the New York chapter of The Black Rock Coalition. Earl worked in radio for nearly two decades at WNEW-FM and XM Satellite Radio, which included being the on-air producer for Carol Miller, Scott Muni and Ron & Fez, and a contributor to Opie & Anthony. Earl has also independently published a number of books including Black Rock Volume 1, Urban Abyss, Mobile Uploads, and For Shimmy. His latest project is the photojournalism magazine PRAXIS, which is available exclusively through Blurb.com.