Comedians Remember Brody Stevens With Broken Hearts

Comedian Brody Stevens died on Friday at the age of 48. TMZ reported that Stevens committed suicide in his Los Angeles home. Stevens had struggled with mental health issues and had been diagnosed with bipolar disorder. But he had just recently performed two days before at a comedy festival, and if he had been contemplating suicide, nobody seemed to know it. He had roles in movies, “The Hangover” and “The Hangover II” and an unforgettable Comedy Central series “Brody Stevens: Enjoy It!” And he did warm up for television shows like “Why? With Hannibal Buress,” “Chelsea Lately,” “Who Gets The Last Laugh?,” and “The Best Damn Sports Show Period.” But his tv and film credits only tell a small part of the story of his life. More than anything else he was a stand up comedian, and loved and respected by everyone in the business. As the news spread across social media and in the press on Friday night, comedians flocked to social media to mourn, share their grief- using words to express their loss like devastated, heartbroken, and shaken to the core. It seemed that everyone in the community had a Brody Stevens story to share and everyone was crushed by the news.

A rep for Brody issued a statement. “Brody was an inspiring voice who was a friend to many in the comedy community. “He pushed creative boundaries and his passion for his work and his love of baseball were contagious. He was beloved by many and will be greatly missed. We respectfully ask for privacy at this time.” This was an understatement.

Across social media comedians tell a more personal story of their friend, and begged each other to look out for their friends, check in, look for signs of depression and offer help. They described him as one of the hearts of the Los Angeles comedy community but you didn’t have to be a Los Angeles comic to know and love him. People everywhere were shaken.

The messages they left on the interet tell the story of a complicated guy, who had darkness and light to share. Paul Provenza expressed in a post, saying, “Though there was such a darkness in him, he still brightened every room he was in. He could peer into your soul and say exactly what you didn’t even know you needed to hear. Gone too soon. We’ve had too little time to enjoy his friendship.” Dave Attell called him “a true original. The only thing more fun than watching him on stage, were the great talks we had off stage.”

Friends and colleagues told stories about how he would get up on stage and improvise and was particularly great at reaching tough crowds. “Every set was insane and singular,” Joel Kim Booster wrote and recalled a time when Brody handled a crowd with “awful teen girls who just wanted to be in the AC” by doing 20 minutes about their homework. Jay Larson said you couldn’t truly get Brody unless you saw him live and in person. “It was the most unique and original experience you could have in stand up,” he wrote on his Instagram. “There was only one Brody. He was the only comic who’s social media I would watch to simply watch HIM! Brody throwing in a batting cage, drumming in his car, driving around with some old dude or messing with Mariano Rivera in Japan…he was entertaining.” Kate Berlant talked about being in awe of Stevens, who she called “incapable of conformity.” You repeatedly hear comics talking about how he could make them belly laugh or laugh till they cry- something that comedians don’t do often because they hear so much comedy. wrote that he will always remember him as “having fun and making the best of impossible situations. Which he did ALL THE TIME.” John Roy had what may have been the most shared story across the internet- remembering a time when he and Brody were doing a show for industry people- something notoriously difficult because industry people don’t laugh- and even though every comic had bombed, performing to virtual crickets, Brody cracked the room, making everyone laugh, and clearing the path for everyone after him to have great sets. Jesse Thorn talked about how he could keep a crowd warm for four hours.

People referenced how much he liked to play drums, his 818 signature, his command to positive energy, and the way they would spend late nights pretending to be audience members when Brody was on stage. They called him original, magical, fearless, criminally underrated, a force of nature, singular, kind, brilliant and hilarious.

“We never lite him because some people need no lights,” Tiffany Puterbaugh wrote, recalling the times Stevens would stop by their show, Entertaining Julia, in Chicago. “He could make anyone, anywhere, anytime laugh uncontrollably and sometimes not even know why.” Matt Braunger remembered a time they were playing in a tent to a bunch of baseball heroes and by the end of the night, Brody was the celebrity everyone wanted to meet. Scott Thompson described him as “a powerful tornado taking the strangest path.” Chris D’Elia wrote “Brody Stevens made me, and all comics, laugh differently than anyone else we saw. On or off stage. He was on another wavelength. I really mean this when I say I’ve never seen anything quite like it. He was so unique that whenever he would go on at The Comedy Store we would all come in and watch.” James Adomian remembered how Brody made him feel like a part of a team. “He was always there: sweet, goofy and supportive offstage, a glorious, ferocious force onstage – prowling around like a lion that had somehow figured out how to make fun of itself through its own bravado. His style – attack the room – was enchanting to witness and a huge influence on me and many of our friends.” Neil Hamburger shared, “His show was a breathtaking whirlwind unlike anything I’ve ever seen before…what “improv” should be, but never is.”

Everyone is reeling. “I am fucking heart broken. You were everything a comedian should be. Funny to the core!!! I’m sad and I’m angry and I’ll miss you,” writes Eddie Ifft. From Nick Swardson, “Crying a lot today. His leg kick at the end was amazing. And playing a chair. I first met him 20 years ago at a club called Surf Reality. Never forget it. I’m like “what is this guy doing?” Haha. He was doing whatever the fuck he wanted.” Jim Jefferies said “I am completely shattered.” Tammy Pescatelli wrote “I can’t standup. My heart is broken!”.

He made so many friends working on Chelsea, Lately, and comics like Guy Branum wrote remembering great times on the show. “The in-studio audience was just never as good as when Brody Stevens was getting them in the zone. He knew how to open people up, because he was always open.”

And people loved to hang out with Brody off stage. Dave Attell wasn’t the only one who referenced spending time offstage. Brendan Eyre talked about the time Stevens said to him “do you want to go in the woods and throw rocks at trees?” And we did. He probably wouldn’t remember, but I loved it so much.” The Sklars wrote that “he was the only guy we knew who if you hung out with for a bit you started talking like him.” Nick Youssef wrote on Instagram about meeting him 15 years ago. “There was no telling where the line between Brody the artist and Brody the guy was and that’s because there wasn’t a line. He was just Brody all day and all night onstage and offstage.”

Many were angry, and saddened. and looking for answer. Like Marlon Wayans who asked that people find out what meds Stevens was taken and what side effects they might have had. “We are losing too many people from suicide.” Adam Ray posted a photo and you can feel the anguish in what he wrote on Instagram. “Look at this face… he lit up every corner, club, coffee shop… He had his struggles with depression.. and it makes my heart fucking ache to know he was in so much pain to do this to himself. We can’t just say “talk to someone if they’re hurting.” We all gotta do a better job of checking in. This shouldn’t have fucking happened. Brody loved life. And shit did life love Brody.” From Andrew Santino, “I’m so fucking sad I could melt.”

Others posted videos of their favorite Brody moments captured on tape, and you should watch all of them. And just about everyone had a favorite photo laughing or arguing or just having fun with Brody.

The list of comics who paid homage to Brody on social media is all encompassing crossing all boundaries of race, gender, club alliances, all levels of fame and styles of comedy; road dogs, movie stars, tv actors, writers, directors. Beautiful words form the likes of Paul Provenza, Dave Attell, Doug Stanhope, , Jim Jefferies, Kristen Schaal, Natasha Leggero, Joey Diaz, Maria Bamford, David Spade, Bobby Lee, T.J. Miller, Nick Kroll, Judah Friedlander, Doug Stanhope, Christina P, Riki Lindhome, Whitney Cummings, Kate Berlant, Kumail Nanjiani, Nate Bargatze, Chris D’Elia, , Bert Kreischer, Andy Levy, Dice, Joel Kim Booster, Tim Heidecker, Amy Miller, Eric Andre, Jim Gaffigan, Guy Branum, Steve Agee, John Hodgman, Joe Rogan, Neil Hamburger, Esther Ku, Margaret Cho, Ken Jeong, Moshe Kassier, Tiffany Haddish, , Tom Segura, Loni Love, Scott Thompson, Tom Green, the Sklars, Dane Cook, Tom Arnold, Adam McKay, Scott Aukerman, Patton Oswalt, Jay Pharoah, Dana Gould, Russell Peters, , Nikki Glaser, just to name a few.

Read through these stories and you’ll begin to understand what a gigantic loss comedy is feeling tonight. Condolences to Brody’s many friends, and family.

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Brody Stevens made me, and all comics, laugh differently than anyone else we saw. On or off stage. He was on another wavelength. I really mean this when I say I’ve never seen anything quite like it. He was so unique that whenever he would go on at The Comedy Store we would all come in and watch. He also STILL has the best set I’ve ever seen live with my own eyes. Those late night Brody Stevens Comedy Store sets were something special to witness. Every single one of them. They were all different and always funny. A lot of us strive to be as unique as he was. If you haven’t heard of him or seen his act, look him up. He’d love that. He was a true talent… and he was my friend. I was lucky to be around him as much as I was, even though now… I wished it was more. I’ll miss you and your high kicks, Brody. We loved you. We still do. This one hurts. 💔

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Today I got The very Sad News That Comedian BRODY STEVENS Took His Own life . He was a Great Comedian who was embraced by any Comedian that Knew Him . I myself spent many hours laughing and talking shop with him at our favorite Starbucks . I knew He had many issues so I would always look to Build him up . He was in The Hangover Films and did his own Series ( The name Escapes me right now) . He was a Sweet And kind Human Being . I would put his Picture up if I knew How , But it is all over the Internet now . I will Miss Him. Life is Precious , I Have always understood that . I , like Everybody go through Bad days , months and Years , But Have always seem the light at the End of The Tunnel. He Obviously was Extreme with mental issues that most can’t understand . You were an Amazing Comedian / Baseball Player . Our Community and Anyone Who Got to know you ,Including my own Sons will Always Love ❤️ You .

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Brody has been part of the Los Angeles comedy scene for as long as I can remember. We met 15 years ago and bonded over being LA natives (818 till we die!!). I never got tired of watching him do standup. He was as original as they come. There was no telling where the line between Brody the artist and Brody the guy was and that’s because there wasn’t a line. He was just Brody all day and all night onstage and offstage. He knew no other way and that was part of his genius. I can’t imagine comedy without him in it. No more late night sets at The Store where we would pretend we were audience members and feed him setups to his jokes or watching his car windows get cloudy as he played drumsticks against his steering wheel to warm up to his set or the completely random intros he would give comics in the halls as if they were on the starting lineup of his baseball team complete with facts about your actual life. Thanks for all the positive energy Brody. #yougotit #positiveenergy #818tillIdie

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It’s like a mountain just vanished. RIP Brody

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Truly heartbroken hearing the loss of the fabulous Steven Brody Stevens. I first met Brody in 2016 at the taping of The Standups season 1, he was the warm up comic that brought the heat. To watch him work was inspirational and astonishing, the way he worked a room would bring you to your knees. After seeing and meeting him after the taping, I was hooked… I was a Brody Head #818valleylife Since then I always had the pleasure of catching a show with Brody on the lineup, either at The Lyric Hyperion, The Hollywood Improv(Lab) or of course The Comedy Store. At every show, Brody would either point me out in the crowd or we would talk after the show. He’s truly a legend and a phenomenal person on and off stage. I’ll truly miss seeing his big smile and hearing is loud voice during a set “YES!” And “You got it!” And hearing the true love for Apple Cider Vinegar, also his Baseball Videos doing Spring camps and the Peak of the Season ⚾️ Til the next time, good sir! I hope where ever you are at this moment… you’re throwing some fast Pitches, drinking Apple Cider Vinegar and wait for a spot to point out the person with Crossed Arms “No, Negative energy” 👍😉 #818 #thevalley #baseball #comedylegend #applecidervinegar #818pride #legend

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Sending my love to the friends and family of @brodyismefriend . He was so funny, so kind and always “crushed” as the kids say @ Entertaining Julia any time he was in Chicago and then LA. We never lite him because some people need no lights. It only got better the longer he was onstage. He could make anyone , anywhere, anytime laugh uncontrollably and sometimes not even know why. He was always so sweet to me and my sis @puterbaughdani . It breaks my heart that the world lost a genius comic and kind person . La can be so hard and this “showbiz” thing we are all doing can be self serving. Often times it’s hard to look outside of oneself and notice other people hurt to. I think we all would be happier if we took time to give a little love to someone else each day. So, today I send my love to my beautiful friends and the friends and family of @brodyismefriend . I am grateful to have known Brody and to have gotten to watch him shine. #chicago #baseball #brodystevens #entertainingjulia #LA

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Whenever Brody got on stage, I stopped what I was doing, excused myself from who I was talking to and watched because when he got on stage anything could happen. No set was the same. His best ones had these high peaks and low valleys that made you feel like you experienced a performance that was so personal to the people in the room that you couldn't help but leave a fan and like you saw something that could never be repeated. He was everyone's friend and everyone was his fan. On top of it all, he was a sweet man who taught me the beauty of kettle bells, not crossing your arms, and the #818. I will miss him. #Enjoyit —- @kitao_sakurai said it best RIP: #RESTINPOSITIVITY. (I stole this picture from @robhuebel Brody was always a regular at Crash Test Show whenever he came it was the highlight of the night.) 📷 @withreservation

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This was the last time I saw @brodyismefriend. I am utterly heart broken. I first met him at an open mic in a Starbucks in New York City over twenty years ago. He was the only one there that could get a laugh. He went on to become the barker (the guy who talks people on the sidewalk walking by into coming in to the show) at the @comedycellarusa. Often times he was funnier on the street than the comedian on stage. Soon after that we shot a scene in a short film of @justin.foran where I couldn’t get through the scene with him because he was making me laugh so hard. He kept putting Chap Stick on his lips in the middle of his line. For years I wondered how the entertainment business could be so blind to such amazing talent and then one day his career took off. He did movies, tv shows, specials, toured, warmed-up shows (the best ever). Our business is competitive and difficult, but never once was I the least bit jealous of Brody. I thought he deserved every ounce of success and then some. He was funny to the core, soulfully funny if you will. He was what every comedian should strive to be – a true original. I did many podcasts over the years with him. Some not so funny. Often times he took our show to a place I would rather not go, but it gave me insight to the dark side of this comedic genius. I’m being selfish now, because I am angry and I miss him. I wish this didn’t happen, but nobody will ever know exactly what he was going through. His work is like all great artists. He left it out there for you to consume. So go search around the internet and soak up everything he created. It sounds cliche, but he truly did make the world a better place. We are all going to miss this great one! In the words of Brody, “ENJOY IT!”

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Wow. I have been balling since I heard. I looked up to Brody and he was so kind to me as he was to everyone who he encountered. A true light in a dark place. He was so sweet to even the newest comics. Years before I was a Paid Regular at the Store he would include me in his late night sets. I would pretend to be an app developer and play his soundboard of “Brodyisms” from the back of the room. He would accuse me of recording his set, bring me to the stage, and I would show him the app. He then would play his own soundboard into the mic while he stared down the audience with only the confidence that Steven Brody Stevens had. So many late night hangs, shows, podcasts, and positive conversations. We can all take a chapter out of the Brody Kindness book. Love you Brody. I’m here for anybody who’s sad. We all miss you already friend. #ripbrody #brodystevens #positivepush #yougotit #818 #yes #festivaloffriendship

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Fuck!!! 💔💔💔 #BrodyStevens

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I HATE WHEN PEOPLE MAKE LOSS ALL ABOUT THEM BUT RIGHT NOW IM SO FUCKING SAD I COULD MELT SO FUCK IT. Brody was one of the sweetest and funniest dudes in our world. He would always greet you with this same smile that was half character Brody and half real Brody. This pix was 2013 and you can see @chrisdelia was still my nemesis and I was a homeless vagrant and Brody I’m sure said something that we all laughed at. “Arizona State!” He would yell when I saw him in the hallways and it always made me smile. I’m gonna miss seeing his big hairy body so so so much. Fuck this sucks I don’t want any comments on this pic because they can get gross and lame. So please take time to really talk to people you love and respect because they might not be around the next time you wish to see them. If you are going through depression PLEASE get help. If you don’t know where to turn. Ask me and I will help you as much as I can. “818 TILL I DIE”

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Goodbye Steven Brody Stevens. I treasure every moment, every memory … I knew Brody since way back in the earliest days of my showbiz life, at El Cid and the Ramada basement shows. When I was new he made me feel like a pro, like we were part of a team. He was always there: sweet, goofy and supportive offstage, a glorious, ferocious force onstage – prowling around like a lion that had somehow figured out how to make fun of itself through its own bravado. His style – attack the room – was enchanting to witness and a huge influence on me and many of our friends. “It’s ALL. About. The ENERGY.” I believe it as an ethos because of him. I remember Brody lifting kettlebells in the hall before going onstage to do a set – like, what?! I remember him introducing me onstage by lauding me for going to high school in the Valley – like it was somehow a major moral accomplishment. I remember him many times REQUIRING a timid audience to pick it up and start laughing. He was my favorite host to be on a show with because he could single-handedly whip any room into a frenzy. We did a lot together. My best memories are moments like the one pictured here, at the Bridgetown Comedy Festival in 2012. I think we kept going up back to back, interrupting eachother’s sets? So many nights like that. Brody would hop offstage without hesitation and perform from the audience. The whole room became the stage. It had been a while since I saw Brody, and these last couple of weeks in particular I was hoping to run into him at a show soon. God fuck. Everyone loves you Brody. We all miss you. #818forLIFE #818tiliDIE #YesS #PositiveEnergy #YouGOTit #Brody 📷: @artrulz

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I’m not exactly sure how I’m supposed to process this. I don’t want to. I’ve never, in my entire life, known a more genuine soul on & off stage. Someone who was as present with you, as he was with a stranger. Keeping funny & human at the forefront of his mind… always. Most friends and fans of the great Brody Stevens, knew from his time in LA, but for me, I knew of him when he co-hosted a public access show in Seattle. I was in middle school, and was introduced to a new medium of television, a new personality, a new way to make people laugh. Little did I know I’d be lucky enough to call him my friend one day. And we both meant it. He meant it with everyone. He cared about people and comedy so deeply. And no one has ever been more captivating on stage than Brody Stevens. My first day in LA, I attended a taping of BEST DAMN SPORTS SHOW, and he was the warmup guy. I screamed at the top of my lungs so exited, “Teina & Brody Show!” He got so excited and screamed right back, “YESSSSS! Seattle! That guy is from the Pacific Northwest!! Home of Jay Buchner and Microsoft!! He… GETS IT!!” He came up to me after the show, talked with us, gave me standup advice, and said “never stop pushing through.” Sad doesn’t describe how so many are feeling right now. I hate posting this shit. It’s not fair. Brody should have been with us forever. We need Brody. We need his smile and his spirit and his energy… and his love. Look at this face… he lit up every corner, club, coffee shop… He had his struggles with depression.. and it makes my heart fucking ache to know he was in so much pain to do this to himself. We can’t just say “talk to someone if they’re hurting.” We all gotta do a better job of checking in. This shouldn’t have fucking happened. Brody loved life. And shit did life love Brody💔#ripbrodystevens #positivepush #thecomedystore

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@brodyismefriend was a ray of light, hysterical and wholly inclusive. Very early on, he made me felt that I belonged to the LA comedy community that I love so dearly. We talked a couple weeks ago about his journey in comedy and baseball. He told me comedy was about staying positive, sharing positivity – he said that worked for him; I'll always carry that sentiment. He was a caring person and an incredible baseball player with magnetic character – so much so that the rival coach he beat in high school championships ("Reseda beat Chatsworth… YYYYES!") later invited him to play Winterball for the Chicago Cubs. His heart always reached across the stage and diamond, he sent me the offer letter he treasured so much. Love you always, Brody #positivepush #positiveenergy #818

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RIP friend. #BrodyStevens #818tillidie

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Brody has been part of the Los Angeles comedy scene for as long as I can remember. We met 15 years ago and bonded over being LA natives (818 till we die!!). I never got tired of watching him do standup. He was as original as they come. There was no telling where the line between Brody the artist and Brody the guy was and that’s because there wasn’t a line. He was just Brody all day and all night onstage and offstage. He knew no other way and that was part of his genius. I can’t imagine comedy without him in it. No more late night sets at The Store where we would pretend we were audience members and feed him setups to his jokes or watching his car windows get cloudy as he played drumsticks against his steering wheel to warm up to his set or the completely random intros he would give comics in the halls as if they were on the starting lineup of his baseball team complete with facts about your actual life. Thanks for all the positive energy Brody. #yougotit #positiveenergy #818tillIdie

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