Lock Yourself In Weekend: Contemporary B&W


Technological advances are always bringing new ways to create film, but when a director chooses to use an old style, they are making an artistic statement. One particularly strong statement is the use of black and white. The release of The Artist in black and white last year, this year’s Frankenweenie, and the upcoming Alexander Payne black and white film prove the art form is alive and well. We picked some of our favorite “modern” films that use the beauty of black and white to their full advantage to create this “Lock Yourself in Weekend” Contemporary Black and White Film Festival.

    

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1.  Psycho (1960)

The last black and white movie Alfred Hitchcock and long after Hitchcock had moved on to making color movies like Rear Window and Vertigo. Using his tv crew and using the cheaper looking black and white photography gives the impression of being a cheap thriller. But the black and white also establishes the creepy sense that something is always a little off, especially when we arrive at the Bates Motel, which seems to be in a place of perminant fog, where shadows can completely hide a face. Watch the shot-by-shot remake in color (or one of the three sequels) to see if color makes a difference.

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2.  Dr. Strangelove: Or How I Stopped Worrying and Learned to Love the Bomb (1964)

Like Hitchcock, Kubrick played with black and white long after color was the norm. But to create the not-so-alternate alternate-relatity of Dr. Stangelove, he filmed in the style of tv news programs or documentaries of the time. The approach gives the social/political satire a chilling realism and more disturbing to audiences. The one thing black and white couldn’t establish however was the pokertable green the characters sit around for most of the movie, a prop Kubrick insisted on, because the characters were treating nuclear war like a game. But it probably shows in the performances anyway.

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3.  The Last Picture Show (1970)

Peter Bogdanovich fought with the studio to produce The Last Picture Show in Black and White, wanting to make a film that evoked his heroes John Ford and Orson Welles. And filming the 50’s era movie in stark black and white evoked the isolated depression of a small town in Texas that offers little to its residences. From the dusty streets to the sprawling, empty landscapes, the movie instantly places you in mindset of the young people desperate to escape their small town.

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4.  Young Frankenstein (1974)

Mel Brook’s throwback to the Hollywood golden age is one of his subtlest parody films ever made. His retelling of the Frankenstein story is told using the same visual styles and effects of movies from the 1930s and 40s which utilized dramatic lighting, dramatically contrasting black and whites, and inventive make up to give the impression of color. And going back to the 1930s gave Brooks the perfect opportunity include a little song and dance, Fred Astaire style.

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5.  Manhattan (1979)

’s ultimate love letter to New York is also oneo of the most beautiful examples of why black and white cinematography is a true art form. Allen has made several films in black and white, but it would be hard to find a better example of the look of a film reflecting the state of mind of its main character. Allen’s character sees the world like a black and white movie from the golden age, when art deco was in vogue, the city was glamorous and even unconvential romances could be thrilling.

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6.  Clerks (1994)

’s first film, made on the cheap, isn’t as “beautiful” as these other films. Rather, it used the look of video servalence to create the impression of a documentary, cinema verite movie about just how boring life in a convience store could be. It adds something to the impression of the movie feeling captured, even when it gets incredibly goofy (like that same actor have about 6 parts in the movie).

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7.  Ed Wood (1994)

Tim Burton embraces black and white photography more than most directors today. Some of his films use partial black and white, others are filmed with just a black and white palette  But these influences all come from his love of classic Hollywood, and he showed loving tribute with what some call his best and most personal film, Ed Wood. The ultimate metamovie starring , Sarah Jessica Parker, Johnny Depp, and Oscar Winner Martin Landau is filmed to look like the movies Ed Wood the director desperately wanted to emulate.

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Lesley Coffin is the Features/Interviews Editor for the movie site Filmoria. She has also written the books Lew Ayres: Hollywood Conscientious Objector (2012) and Hitchcock's Stars (2014), and currently writing a third book. Look for her brand new podcast, "Lake Shore Drive to Hollywood" part of the Second Wind Collective podcast network. Follow on twitter @filmbiographer for thoughts on movies and cat pictures.

40 Comments

  1. Steffen Peffen

    November 8, 2012 at 11:45 am

    Nice list.  I would only add PAPER MOON.

    • someone

      November 9, 2012 at 10:58 am

      I love Paper Moon so much (but I also like Last Picture Show a little more, sadder).  Jim Jarmush’s Down by Law and The Man Who Wasn’t There too.

  2. c_ocobean

    November 8, 2012 at 12:43 pm

    I loved the aesthetic of Rumble Fish…not to mention kick ass (Steward Copeland) Sound track.

  3. madtowntom

    November 8, 2012 at 12:46 pm

    gotta try ‘ Fail Safe ” fonda as prez, Larry Hagman, Walter Mathau, awesome cast, wargames type plot, 5 stars.

    • galactictraveler

      November 9, 2012 at 12:57 pm

      @madtowntom Great fucking movie! How about Twelve O’ Clock High ?
      Not exactly contemporary ( 1949 ) but still a movie you can’t turn off. !

  4. NicoleRose1

    November 8, 2012 at 1:47 pm

    what about schindler’s list?best make-out movie

  5. Hepcat22

    November 9, 2012 at 10:59 am

    The Manchurian Candidate (Frank Sinatra’s original)  Great, great movie.

    • Binary Daoist

      November 9, 2012 at 12:43 pm

      @Hepcat22 Love that movie… Angela Lansbury is scary as hell in it

  6. Rorschach7

    November 9, 2012 at 12:36 pm

    I normally only work in black and white now.

  7. Steve_in_Tampa

    November 9, 2012 at 12:39 pm

    Like the great Ronnie B, I don’t see films in terms of black and white, only people.

  8. PatInTheBronx

    November 9, 2012 at 12:40 pm

    Von Ryan’s Express. Frank Sinatra, Trevor Howard- All about WW2.

    • galactictraveler

      November 9, 2012 at 12:50 pm

      @PatInTheBronx the movie was color. Good movie !

  9. drewodrew

    November 9, 2012 at 12:41 pm

    Wings of Desire (1987)

    • DeathProof

      November 9, 2012 at 1:03 pm

      @drewodrew Great film!

  10. GeesDevilsTail1

    November 9, 2012 at 12:41 pm

    No Schindlers List????

    • Recyclerz

      November 9, 2012 at 12:46 pm

      @GeesDevilsTail1
       The little girl in the red coat roooned it.

      • GeesDevilsTail1

        November 9, 2012 at 12:48 pm

        @Recyclerz lol – thats terrible

      • Recyclerz

        November 9, 2012 at 12:49 pm

        @GeesDevilsTail1
         Tell that to Ron who just stole my joke 😉

  11. harlequincy

    November 9, 2012 at 12:42 pm

    Raging Bull…lots a blood in those fights, but without the reds.

  12. Rich in Tampa

    November 9, 2012 at 12:45 pm

    The Elephant Man

  13. galactictraveler

    November 9, 2012 at 12:47 pm

    ” The Bedford Incident ” Sydney Poitier and Richard Widmark

  14. Moon Rocks

    November 9, 2012 at 12:48 pm

    My favorite colored film, ok the other hand, is Madea goes to jail.

  15. LizSetsFire

    November 9, 2012 at 12:50 pm

    I love the recent movies on this list. I’m going to give some of the older ones a try. I don’t have any trouble with subtitled films but black and white has been a struggle for me in the past. So uncultured, I know.

    • harlequincy

      November 9, 2012 at 12:53 pm

      @LizSetsFire just rock’em with a head full of acid.

    • Gunner

      November 10, 2012 at 10:00 am

      @LizSetsFire for a great older one try 12 angry men.

  16. DeathProof

    November 9, 2012 at 12:52 pm

    Excellent list! Every film on here is worth watching more than once.

  17. ChrisBrown1

    November 9, 2012 at 12:52 pm

    Stranger Than Paradise and Down By Law

  18. DeathProof

    November 9, 2012 at 12:52 pm

    Pi is missing!

  19. Recyclerz

    November 9, 2012 at 12:52 pm

    Eraserhead 
    Wait – that’s for a lock yourself up in a nut hut weekend.

  20. DeathProof

    November 9, 2012 at 12:53 pm

    Man Bites Dog

  21. DeathProof

    November 9, 2012 at 12:55 pm

    Night of the Living Dead

  22. DeathProof

    November 9, 2012 at 12:56 pm

    Rumble Fish

  23. DeathProof

    November 9, 2012 at 12:57 pm

    Coffee and Cigarettes

  24. DeathProof

    November 9, 2012 at 12:58 pm

    The Artist

  25. JAFO1966

    November 9, 2012 at 12:59 pm

    The Elephant Man & Eraserhead

  26. DeathProof

    November 9, 2012 at 1:01 pm

    Lenny

  27. GoodMovie

    November 9, 2012 at 1:05 pm

    What about the Human Centipede Part 2?

  28. CryBaby1

    November 12, 2012 at 8:25 pm

    Is spell check a thing of the past? Servalence? Really? Unconvential? WTF?  Convience. Jeez. “gave Brooks the perfect opportunity include a little song and dance”……did you mean “…..TO include a little song and dance…..”? “…..And filming the 50′s era movie in stark black and white evoked the isolated depression of a small town in Texas that offers little to its residences.” I just know you meant “residents”, right? “alternate-relatity”……yeah, got it. “The last black and white movie Alfred Hitchcock and long after Hitchcock had moved on to making color movies like Rear Window and Vertigo.” The last B&W movie Alfred Hitchcock…..what? “perminant fog”…..yeah, that sums up this article.

  29. max_beta

    November 13, 2012 at 10:12 am

    I guess it just misses the cutoff of contemporary, but The Night of the Hunter (1955) might have the best cinematography of any film I’ve ever seen. A great example of just what you can do to use light & shadows to set a mood in a B&W film. Plus Robert Mitchum gives a great performance.

  30. DelCoTrash

    November 13, 2012 at 11:48 am

    la haine, people sleep on foreign flim.  they don’t need a big ad or even correct spelling